foolish mistakes, but whatever, they are all mine.
Mostly-cis, fat ,middle aged, bisexual, disabled, white femme. My hobby is seeing how many years I can add to my collection before I die.

Posting will be random but may contain fat acceptance, wool, and cats, lagomorphs and corvids in no particular order. Posting may also be sporadic as I have ME/CFS and a bunch of other stuff that makes me tired and some times crabby.

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This Woman Has Been Confronting Her Catcallers — And Secretly Filming Their Reactions


Don’t read the comments, seriously.

Power feminism is just another scam in which women get to play patriarchs and pretend that the power we seek and gain liberates us.

bell hooks

Let’s talk about this quote for a second.

I remember I attended a college lecture about what feminism means in America and how imperial politics and economic gaps between the West and East render what women want and consider pivotal to their feminism as conflicting and even antagonistic to each other.

My feminism, first and foremost, will always be anti-imperialism.

Imperial politics are dangerous and the very essence of narcissism. Imperial politics demonstrated within a feminist frame usually goes as follows: the most privileged women, ie. those who have access to technology, representation, occupy a particular media-friendly image or ideology and have access to those in higher slots in society are allotted platforms to speak about their experiences as women and without question, this gets presumptuously labelled “women’s experiences”. Being that women who are globally bestowed the highest tier are usually allowed such room to speak, their minimal struggles are then homogenized as the quintessential female experience and misogyny is wholeheartedly announced a tangible issue that can be easily eradicated out of modern Western society.

Its no accident that women of color, women in occupied regions and those who face mass political or economic repression and their words which don’t satisfy neoliberal, imperialist gaze are deemed anti-progressive, race baiters, backwards, terrorist apologists, etc. Our complex, multi-faceted struggles within a white supremacist empire tap into too many accepted status quos for the average American moderate. It forces those who legitimize the war on terror and view racism as an entity of the past to confront their own unsightly prejudices and the systematic brutality their nations enacts on various global societies, as well as within its borders. Its easier to find (and fabricate) any reason to demonize the likes of Trayvon Martin and his family for his own tragic demise or deem young Yemeni children necessary collateral damage for “the greater good” than to examine what other oppressions beyond misogyny exist that unquestionably burden the lives of otherized communities, including and especially the women in said communities.

Power feminism expects women to unanimously rejoice in the presidential election of Hillary Clinton, while her administration carries out the same murderous policies as her predecessors. Power feminism labels any legitimate criticism of influential women as inherent egregious misogyny. Power feminism devalues the loss of women’s lives abroad, while infantizling their independent resistance and stripping their agency by shamelessly declaring intervention as saving them. Power feminism within an imperialistic frame needs the hyper-demonization of otherized communities to justify its occupation. Power feminism can be even more dangerous than ruthless misogyny because of its insidious nature and lack of culpability.

(via maarnayeri)

THIS POST IS GOLDEN (via wocinsolidarity)

My fellow men,

cartoongoblin:

It’s not always about us. We don’t have to be the loudest voice at the table. We’re not always entitled to sit at the table. Sometimes the best thing we can do is shut up, listen, and accept what the other person is saying without having to turn it around to be about us.

So stop with the “Not All Men” and the “But What About Men?” BECAUSE IT’S NOT ALWAYS ABOUT US.

articulatebitches:

I wanna clear something the fuck up. Objectification does not mean showing skin. It means reducing a person to merely a body or just parts.

So you can stop with your women objectify themselves just because they’re wearing revealing clothing shit.

Best.

knucklesandpi:

meerkat probably doesn’t need feminism as much as homo sapiens because it already lives in a matriarchal hunter/gatherer society with gender equality norms and shared community responsibility for all tasks.

knucklesandpi:

meerkat probably doesn’t need feminism as much as homo sapiens because it already lives in a matriarchal hunter/gatherer society with gender equality norms and shared community responsibility for all tasks.

(Source: doglife420)

star-anise:

So some dudes were complaining lately, “Women are telling guys to stop telling them how to dress, but not all guys are total misogynists!  Women do it to each other too!”
So. People.  Let me tell you a thing.
This is a picture of a panopticon. It’s a kind of prison.  See, it’s a giant circle, with all the cells around the rim.  The tower in the middle is where the guards are.  The guards can see into all the prisoners’ cells, but the prisoners cannot see each other, and they have difficulty seeing the guards.  Each prisoner knows that at any time, they are being watched, and if the guards see them behaving incorrectly, they will come with truncheons and beat the prisoner up.  They learn to feel that gaze on them, all the time; every movement makes them think, “What if this breaks the rules, and they see, and they come and punish me?”  Soon, prisoners don’t need guards standing over them all the time to follow the rules; they do it themselves, because that gaze is omnipresent.  Even when the guard house is empty, they still think, “What if someone is watching me?”  (This is all from Michel Foucault.  You want more on this, go read Discipline and Punish, enjoy the descriptions of medieval torture.)
The panopticon is a metaphor.  In our society, we are constantly watched, tracked, disciplined, and punished, from childhood. The school says you skipped class today.  The babysitter says you wouldn’t follow the rules.  The police saw you at the park with your friends.  We are held to valid rules, and to bullshit rules; some of them are necessary to make our society safe, and some of them just make us easier to exploit.
You are held to rules.  I am held to rules.  They vary.  As a woman, I am held to rules that say be small be pretty defer to someone else and I’m punished in different ways if I don’t obey.  My brother is held to different rules, that say be strong don’t feel dominate the situation.  We end up policing each other; we meet and he says, “Looking good,” and I remember: people are watching how I dress and how I look.  If I disobey, they will notice, and I could be punished.  I meet him after his job and ask, “Do you think you’ll be promoted soon?” and he remembers: people pay attention to whether or not I’m in charge, and if I’m not dominant, I could be punished.
Sometimes the guardhouse is empty.  Sometimes nobody is paying close attention to what I’m wearing.  Sometimes the guards don’t come to punish me, so whether or not I am pretty or attractive does not affect whether I get to own property.  (It used to: whether or not my ancestresses were married affected their legal and economic statuses hugely)
Feminism is about the work of dismantling the prison when it comes to bullshit rules.  It’s about saying that we shouldn’t be held to stupid rules based on gender.  So it’s about the work of getting rid of the cells and the watchtower, and getting rid of the guards with truncheons.  We can stop telling each other these stories about all the rules we’re held to, and we can stop punishing each other for breaking them.  My brother stops telling me, “You’ll never get a date if you dress like that.”  I stop telling him, “You need to be strong and work hard so you come out on top.”
So no, feminists don’t believe that all men everywhere are 100% misogynistic.  It’s just that a lot of women are conditioned to think that 100% of the time, there is a risk that someone is watching us, and we will be punished if the break the rules.  It is really hard work to break the social structures and the internal attitudes that imprison us.
And yes, women can enforce the panopticon.  Hell, I’ll even tell you a womanly secret: I cannot count the number of times I’ve received cruelty at the hands of fellow girls for the way I looked or dressed.  My entire middle school experience was basically that and algebra. We’re working on fixing that!  Please, do not doubt that we’ve been working on that among ourselves as a gender.  Women have spent a lot of blood, sweat, and tears trying to change how we treat each other.  Now we’re asking you to pitch in.

star-anise:

So some dudes were complaining lately, “Women are telling guys to stop telling them how to dress, but not all guys are total misogynists!  Women do it to each other too!”

So. People.  Let me tell you a thing.

This is a picture of a panopticon. It’s a kind of prison.  See, it’s a giant circle, with all the cells around the rim.  The tower in the middle is where the guards are.  The guards can see into all the prisoners’ cells, but the prisoners cannot see each other, and they have difficulty seeing the guards.  Each prisoner knows that at any time, they are being watched, and if the guards see them behaving incorrectly, they will come with truncheons and beat the prisoner up.  They learn to feel that gaze on them, all the time; every movement makes them think, “What if this breaks the rules, and they see, and they come and punish me?”  Soon, prisoners don’t need guards standing over them all the time to follow the rules; they do it themselves, because that gaze is omnipresent.  Even when the guard house is empty, they still think, “What if someone is watching me?”  (This is all from Michel Foucault.  You want more on this, go read Discipline and Punish, enjoy the descriptions of medieval torture.)

The panopticon is a metaphor.  In our society, we are constantly watched, tracked, disciplined, and punished, from childhood. The school says you skipped class today.  The babysitter says you wouldn’t follow the rules.  The police saw you at the park with your friends.  We are held to valid rules, and to bullshit rules; some of them are necessary to make our society safe, and some of them just make us easier to exploit.

You are held to rules.  I am held to rules.  They vary.  As a woman, I am held to rules that say be small be pretty defer to someone else and I’m punished in different ways if I don’t obey.  My brother is held to different rules, that say be strong don’t feel dominate the situation.  We end up policing each other; we meet and he says, “Looking good,” and I remember: people are watching how I dress and how I look.  If I disobey, they will notice, and I could be punished.  I meet him after his job and ask, “Do you think you’ll be promoted soon?” and he remembers: people pay attention to whether or not I’m in charge, and if I’m not dominant, I could be punished.

Sometimes the guardhouse is empty.  Sometimes nobody is paying close attention to what I’m wearing.  Sometimes the guards don’t come to punish me, so whether or not I am pretty or attractive does not affect whether I get to own property.  (It used to: whether or not my ancestresses were married affected their legal and economic statuses hugely)

Feminism is about the work of dismantling the prison when it comes to bullshit rules.  It’s about saying that we shouldn’t be held to stupid rules based on gender.  So it’s about the work of getting rid of the cells and the watchtower, and getting rid of the guards with truncheons.  We can stop telling each other these stories about all the rules we’re held to, and we can stop punishing each other for breaking them.  My brother stops telling me, “You’ll never get a date if you dress like that.”  I stop telling him, “You need to be strong and work hard so you come out on top.”

So no, feminists don’t believe that all men everywhere are 100% misogynistic.  It’s just that a lot of women are conditioned to think that 100% of the time, there is a risk that someone is watching us, and we will be punished if the break the rules.  It is really hard work to break the social structures and the internal attitudes that imprison us.

And yes, women can enforce the panopticon.  Hell, I’ll even tell you a womanly secret: I cannot count the number of times I’ve received cruelty at the hands of fellow girls for the way I looked or dressed.  My entire middle school experience was basically that and algebra. We’re working on fixing that!  Please, do not doubt that we’ve been working on that among ourselves as a gender.  Women have spent a lot of blood, sweat, and tears trying to change how we treat each other.  Now we’re asking you to pitch in.

brusierkee:

The Bechdel Test Infographic

I made this for school. I think the bechdel test is important, but I think some people take it too seriously. Just because something passes does not mean women are being represented well. There are plenty of movies that fail that have well developed female characters. 

However it would be nice to have a group of well developed female characters in a single movie, but hey.

upworthy:

Just Made A Rape Joke? Think It’s Edgy? Well Here’s A Truth Bomb.
Comedian Jamie Kilstein thinks we shouldn’t joke about violence against women. That view got him notably shunned from the comedy community; other famous comedians weighed in, called him names, it was a whole thing. As a result, he lost a TV deal, promotional gigs, and friends — all because he said rape jokes are bad.

upworthy:

Just Made A Rape Joke? Think It’s Edgy? Well Here’s A Truth Bomb.

Comedian Jamie Kilstein thinks we shouldn’t joke about violence against women. That view got him notably shunned from the comedy community; other famous comedians weighed in, called him names, it was a whole thing. As a result, he lost a TV deal, promotional gigs, and friends — all because he said rape jokes are bad.

thisgingersnapsback:

let’s see tumblr get as excited about this as they did the totally “inclusive” white ~feminine~ rendition
$20 says nope 

thisgingersnapsback:

let’s see tumblr get as excited about this as they did the totally “inclusive” white ~feminine~ rendition

$20 says nope 

(Source: val3ntea)

fuckyeahfeminists:

queerliberationist:

cishetsnotinvited:

iwahara:

so the last final i did in my last semester of college was for intro to women’s studies and it was a presentation on stuff we took away from the semester

what i took away was “y’all are bad at doin history”

also important to note, Janice Raymond is to be blamed for having trans health care removed as medically necessary in the States. Prior to that, GRS and/or HRT could be covered under insurance policies, but due to Raymond’s meddling,thousands of transgender USians are left w/out a means of paying for surgery or hormones.

(source: http://theterfs.com/terfs-trans-healthcare/)

and her thesis adviser was none other than noted transmisogynist mary daly

Oh wow. Had no idea.

(Source: iwaharamovin)

queennubian:

fuckingrapeculture:

[Images of several women, plus what they had to say. “knowyourIX.org” is on every poster.

I started a survivor support group because in order to create change on campus, we have to take care of each other.
- Sarah, Emerson College

I protested because my school refused to invesitgate reports of harassment, which it’s required to do by law.
- Jasmine, Arizona State University

I published an open letter to my university because it ignores reports of sexual and gendered violence, and that is against federal law.
- Carolynn, UConn

I filed a Title IX complaint because my school didn’t provide the academic accommodations I needed after my abuse.
- Wagatwe, Tufts

I protested and filed a federal clery act complaint because it is illegal for my college to consistently cover up rape, harasssment and hate crimes.
- Nastassja, Dartmouth]

takingbacktheinternet:

You have laws which protect you. did you know that? Spread this so every woman on Tumblr knows. No more silence, no more shame.

For more info: http://knowyourix.org 

this should way way more notes

Weeding out Followers

tofixtheshadows:

femmefrustration:

  • Racism against white people doesn’t exist
  • Sexism against men doesn’t exist
  • Oppression of cis people doesn’t exist
  • Oppression of thin people doesn’t exist
  • Oppression of able people doesn’t exist
  • Oppression of straight people doesn’t exist