foolish mistakes, but whatever, they are all mine.
Mostly-cis, fat ,middle aged, bisexual, disabled, white femme. My hobby is seeing how many years I can add to my collection before I die.

Posting will be random but may contain fat acceptance, wool, and cats, lagomorphs and corvids in no particular order. Posting may also be sporadic as I have ME/CFS and a bunch of other stuff that makes me tired and some times crabby.

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uppityfatty:

This is a life-size pre-cast clay sculpture of a naked fat woman. The model is Julie Srika. The sculptor is Ramon Sierra. I think it’s beautiful and important. Breathtaking, even. Two days ago I shared it on Facebook, with the permission of both the model and the artist. Many people responded to it as I did. Facebook then deleted the thread and removed the photo from the model’s account, citing it as being in violation of their “community standards.” Appeals to Facebook have yet to be answered.
I think this is a disturbing anti-art stance, particularly vexing, considering Facebook allows far more sexually suggestive photos and sanctions pages designed to promote bigotry and bullying. Yet an amazing piece of art depicting a fat woman in proud non-sexual repose must go.
So while this is not the traditional fare for Uppity Fatty, I’m posting it here so more people can see it without the small-minded interference of Facebook’s double-standards.
~ Substantia Jones

uppityfatty:

This is a life-size pre-cast clay sculpture of a naked fat woman. The model is Julie Srika. The sculptor is Ramon Sierra. I think it’s beautiful and important. Breathtaking, even. Two days ago I shared it on Facebook, with the permission of both the model and the artist. Many people responded to it as I did. Facebook then deleted the thread and removed the photo from the model’s account, citing it as being in violation of their “community standards.” Appeals to Facebook have yet to be answered.

I think this is a disturbing anti-art stance, particularly vexing, considering Facebook allows far more sexually suggestive photos and sanctions pages designed to promote bigotry and bullying. Yet an amazing piece of art depicting a fat woman in proud non-sexual repose must go.

So while this is not the traditional fare for Uppity Fatty, I’m posting it here so more people can see it without the small-minded interference of Facebook’s double-standards.

~ Substantia Jones

Fat Acceptance 101

sleepydumpling:

fatoutloud:

  • Stop using the “o” words to describe fat people. The O words “obese” and “overweight” are clinical terms that reinforce the idea that human bodies should all fall into a narrow range of weight in order to be considered healthy. This is problematic on many levels.
  • Stop using the word “fit” as a description for a thin body type. Fit simply means “in good health”. Using the word fit to describe thin people implies two things: that all thin people are in good health, and that those without that body type are in bad health. Fit is not a body size, it is a state of health. And those who are fat can be fit just as those who are thin can be unfit.
  • Stop using the word fat as an insult. It is not ok to use my body type as an insult. Fat is simply a word to describe a body type. It does not mean ugly, unhealthy, lazy, gross, unintelligent, (enter in all the other disgusting words that our fat phobic society likes to link with the word fat), etc. Even saying things like “big fat jerk” “big fat ____” as an insult links the word fat with that insult. Again, not cool. Stop doing it.
  • Stop assuming you know someone’s health, eating habits, exercise habits, and life based on their body size (this includes fat and thin people alike). Thin people shouldn’t be assumed to be anorexic and fat people shouldn’t be assumed to eat massive quantities of food. Thin people shouldn’t be assumed to exercise all the time, only eat “rabbit food”, and have severe and disciplined lives. Fat people shouldn’t be assumed to never exercise, only eat junk food, and have lazy and undisciplined lives. Don’t assume you know anything about a person based on their body size. The only thing you can tell by looking at a thin person is that they are thin. The only thing you can tell by looking at a fat person is that they are fat.
  • Stop assuming that fat people would rather be thin. There are many fat people who absolutely love their bodies (I am one of them) and wouldn’t change it if given the choice. Assuming that a fat person would rather be thin says a lot about your warped perception of thinness and is highly insulting to the fat people who do love their fat bodies.
  • Stop complimenting people on their “weight loss”. This is problematic for many reasons. The most obvious is the assumption that weight loss is always a good thing. As well is the assumption that a thin body type is better than any other body type. There are other problems with complimenting weight loss that I won’t get into at this point.
  • Realize that a healthy body isn’t required for someone to be treated with human dignity and respect. All people have a right to respect and to be treated like a human being. Everyone has a right to be treated with dignity regardless of their body size or their health. You have no right to shame someone based on your ideal of health. And it doesn’t matter if someone is doing something that YOU feel is not healthy, if it’s an adult and if it’s their body, then it’s their business and their business alone. Again, someone else’s health is not your business. 

(It is nearly 2 am and I’m on cold meds as I write this, so if I get anything wrong or left things out (likely) then please feel free to correct me or add things that are important in the Fat Acceptance movement.)

The Rules for Being Fat

sleepydumpling:

loniemc:

#1. Never be seen eating in public.

#2. If you must eat, make sure it is uber-healthy yet tasteless. Never eat anything that is fattening, sweet, or tasty in any way.

#3. Exercise daily to the point of vomiting. This cannot be fun exercise like dancing or skating (who wants to see that!). It must be boring and miserable.

#4. Never be seen exercising in public; you must only exercise in your own home. We don’t want even the possibility of seeing a little fat jiggle. If you break this rule, we reserve the right to call you names and throw trash at you.

#5. You must be on a diet at all times. Preferably, you must be paying for it in some way. We need you to keep supporting the 104+ (Canada & the US) billion dollar diet industry. Yes, we know that you will only gain the weight back plus more. That is part of our plan!

#6. Take diet pills. They may give you a stroke or damage your heart, but you will lose 2-5% of your weight as long as you eat right and exercise as well. Of course, you will gain it back the minute you stop taking the drug.

#7. If a diet does not work, go have your stomach amputated or squeezed (weight loss surgery). You might die of complications. You will be 4x more likely to kill yourself than the rest of the population. If you don’t die, you will most likely have long-term complications and nutritional deficiencies that will reduce your quality of life significantly. You also have an excellent chance of becoming an alcoholic. Oh, and 80% of you will regain the weight.

#8. All your attention, your money, and your focus must be on the fruitless task of losing weight at all times. Nothing else matters. You should never have a life until you succeed at that, no matter that 95% of you will fail and that those who succeed where likely thin folks losing some weight they had gained.

#9. Wear dark, shapeless clothing for which you must pay outrageously. No bright colors or stylishness of any kind.

#10. Never wear anything that lets your flesh be seen. No sleeveless shirts, no shorts, and definitely NO BATHING SUITS!

#11. Never be seen having a good time with friends in public. We want to believe you are sitting home miserable. We certainly do not want to see you laugh.

#12. Never imagine that someone could want you romantically. Love is not for the likes of you. If you do get into a relationship and they happen to be abusive, suck it up and be happy someone bothers to interact with you in any way.

#13. If you break rule #12 and end up in a relationship, never show affection in public. This is especially true if your SO is fat.

#14. If you have children, they must eat perfectly. If they are fat also, we may come take them away.

#15. If you are a fat woman and you get raped, be glad for the attention.

#16. Work daily to blend into the shadows. Never remind us that you are there. We don’t want to see you.

#17. Never expect to have friends. If you do have friends and are female, accept that they might keep you around to make them look good. If you are male, make them laugh, fatty.

#18. Either be very quiet or jolly. Never, ever let us see you angry or upset. Take how we treat you and stuff it.

#19. Never pursue a higher education. If you break this rule and do, don’t you dare complain about accommodations. So what if you class does not have a desk that fits you?

#20. Never pursue a professional career. We don’t want to see the likes of you in our courtrooms or our offices. You won’t be able to find fashionable professional clothes anyway.

#21. Never complain when you are denied a job because of your looks.

#22. If we deign to employ you, never expect to receive the same pay as your coworkers; just be happy that we gave you a job.

#23. Never expect to get a promotion. We could not reward a fat person for anything.

#24. Go to the doctor often. The doctor will tell you that anything wrong with you could be fixed by losing weight. Never complain or speak up in response. Pay your money, hang your head in shame and get out.

#25. Never tell a thin person that thin shaming and fat oppression are different. Never point out that thin shaming is part of the hatred of fat. Never note that thin shaming is calling people names while fat oppression leads to lack of health care options, lack of job options and lack of acceptance in society.

#26. Never tell feminists or diversity advocates that fat belongs as a protected condition. You should not be protected, because you could change it if you really wanted to, fatty.

#27. Never be an academic that focuses on fat studies. We won’t publish your work, even if it is rigorous and well-written. We will keep you from tenure-track jobs. If you do land one of those, we just might deny you tenure.

#28. Never succeed at anything. If you do, we will point out that it doesn’t really count since you are still fat.

#29. Never stand up, stand out or speak up in any way. This would be glorifying obesity. We can’t have that.

#30. Whatever you do, NEVER become a fat activist and point out that society treats fat people unfairly. How dare you question our abuse and oppression of you!

hisblackdress:

Additional details and more fun looks can be found over at HisBlackDress.com, so check that out! The tights in this OOTD are courtesy Donaltellas.com; go check out their awesome range of plus size tights!

Just like in my last OOTD post, here’s another outfit put together around an awesome pair of tights, this time the candy heart print tights from Donatella’sOne thing I’m really digging about this outfit (besides the totally cute tights) is the X’s and O’s in the look via the belt, shoes, and sunglasses. It’s just a bit of a fun little thing to tie in with the heart print, mostly because I love you all. Keep rockin’! xoxo<3

CBC: Obesity research confirms long-term weight loss almost impossible | Living ~400lbs

The CBC has an article on what obesity research shows.

” After years of study, it’s becoming apparent that it’s nearly impossible to permanently lose weight.”

Young people of all sizes placed considerable emphasis on personal responsibility, and on the social, rather than health implications of being overweight. Young people with experience of obesity described severe, unrelenting, size-related abuse and isolation.

'It's on your conscience all the time': a systematic review of qualitative studies examining views on obesity among young people aged 12-18 years in the UK. (via scienceofeds)

It’s on your conscience all the time

Wow. This is the first time I’ve seen this sentiment repeated. It was the response of a teen (or pre-teen) to being asked what it meant to be fat. That the ‘obesity’ cult, by making fat a sin, makes you feel like someone who’s doing wrong. Just by being. It becomes a matter of conscience, just like if you’d wronged someone.

The pressure can be immense. I can’t stand the trivialization of this as just like ‘thin shaming’. No.

(via bumsquash)


Here’s a little secret: Anyone can be a model. You can be a model, too. Yes, you. We, all of us, decide who’s beautiful. We decide who to revere, who to raise up on a pedestal, who to lavish with admiration and desire. What if we decide that anyone can step up there and strut her stuff, be admired for exactly who she is? 
[…]
“I’m terrified,” she said. “But I’m ready.”
I’ll never forget the moment she lifted her dress over her head and stared the camera down, her body proud and her chin lifted high.
She was glorious. She was defiant. She stepped onto the pedestal and lit up as bright as any Venus. She stood tall and brazen in the frigid cold and posed her heart out for a perfect 15 seconds.
(via Sophie Spinell, founder of Shameless Photography, featuring model and body positive activist Denise Jolly)

Here’s a little secret: Anyone can be a model. You can be a model, too. Yes, you. We, all of us, decide who’s beautiful. We decide who to revere, who to raise up on a pedestal, who to lavish with admiration and desire. What if we decide that anyone can step up there and strut her stuff, be admired for exactly who she is? 

[…]

“I’m terrified,” she said. “But I’m ready.”

I’ll never forget the moment she lifted her dress over her head and stared the camera down, her body proud and her chin lifted high.

She was glorious. She was defiant. She stepped onto the pedestal and lit up as bright as any Venus. She stood tall and brazen in the frigid cold and posed her heart out for a perfect 15 seconds.

(via Sophie Spinell, founder of Shameless Photography, featuring model and body positive activist Denise Jolly)

(Source: deviantfemme)

scornfrench:

Bank holiday sundae

The sun has been out, can you believe it?! 

So I was in my local Asda looking at their sale racks. Typically nothing in my size but I found this adorable blouse in a size 22. If I could get it over my bust I was golden. Huzzah! Success! I’ve never rocked the crop shirt look before and I’m kicking myself for it. I have a couple of shirts that’ll be getting the same treatment so look out.

Blouse-George@Asda

Vest-New Look

Skirt-Asos

Leggings-Evans

Shoes-Vans

Necklace-Pieces of the Past (closing down so grab yourself a bargain!)

Headscarf-Cupcakes and Chopsticks

Earrings-Gifted

You can also find me at http://scornfrench.blogspot.co.uk/ where I’ll be chatting more.

lucillebruise:

I am 1000% done with fat activism that doesn’t include double chins, bodies that aren’t hourglass or “pear” shaped, or fat WOC (ESPECIALLY dark skinned Black women). 

"Idealized Fat", "Acceptably Fat", "GOOD FAT" is still exclusionary and harmful, and causes a lot of us to continue to hate ourselves. If you’re going to teach radically inclusive self-love, how about you step it up on the representation. 

misformazing:

buttonpoetry:

Samantha Peterson - “Dead Men Can’t Catcall” (CUPSI 2014)

"Bodies like mine can only be talked about in metaphor. My stomach could be the curve of a sand dune. My calves a flexing ocean."

Our first video from CUPSI Finals Stage! The incredible Samantha Peterson,  from Lewis and Clark College, performing as part of the Best of the Rest

I love this so much.