foolish mistakes, but whatever, they are all mine.
Mostly-cis, fat ,middle aged, bisexual, disabled, white femme. My hobby is seeing how many years I can add to my collection before I die.

Posting will be random but may contain fat acceptance, wool, and cats, lagomorphs and corvids in no particular order. Posting may also be sporadic as I have ME/CFS and a bunch of other stuff that makes me tired and some times crabby.

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(via These are the Fat FAQs | LoveLiveGrow)
You aren’t serious about this “diets don’t work” thing, are you?
Completely serious. Diets don’t work. By diet, I mean anything you are doing to fuck with your eating habits in order to lose weight. Even if you’re fucking with your food to lose weight “for your health”, that’s still a diet. If you’re calling your attempt to lose weight a “lifestyle change” or “eating better and exercising”, it’s still a diet. Whenever attempted weight-loss is studied, the results are a resounding failure. The researchers say things like, “It is only the rate of weight regain, not the fact of weight regain, that appears open to debate.”

(via These are the Fat FAQs | LoveLiveGrow)

You aren’t serious about this “diets don’t work” thing, are you?

Completely serious. Diets don’t work. By diet, I mean anything you are doing to fuck with your eating habits in order to lose weight. Even if you’re fucking with your food to lose weight “for your health”, that’s still a diet. If you’re calling your attempt to lose weight a “lifestyle change” or “eating better and exercising”, it’s still a diet. Whenever attempted weight-loss is studied, the results are a resounding failure. The researchers say things like, “It is only the rate of weight regain, not the fact of weight regain, that appears open to debate.”

What is dieting anyway?

The diet companies love to say that their programs aren’t diets. Maybe they’re “lifestyle changes” or “eating plans.”

Some people say that the word diet has been highjacked - “all it refers to is the way you eat!” But, reinforcing this older, more neutral meaning doesn’t magically make diets into normal eating patterns. It doesn’t change the fact that they’re basically disordered eating, that they almost never work long-term or that they make most people fatter. Saying that the word is being misused doesn’t make what it’s come to refer to disappear.

Click through to read the rest at Big Fat Blog.

1. “Fat” is a neutral descriptive term. It describes the way that a person’s body carries adipose tissue, and says precisely nothing about their moral character, their health, their lifestyle, or their attractiveness. It is not offensive to call me fat - but it is offensive to assume that using the term to describe me is in some way insulting. And as for “but you’re not fat - you’re gorgeous!” - care to elaborate on what your problem is with my being both of these things?

Now - of course - as with any self-identification, there are going to be people who disagree with me here. Fat is a descriptive term with a nasty history - like “queer” or “dyke” - and there are going to be people who won’t want to apply it to themselves under any circumstances; we have to respect that.

But I have very little time for the cultural narrative that casts me as “curvy” and “voluptuous”, and even less for the one that uses “obese” or “overweight”. The former tries to play “good fatty/bad fatty” - it implies that my fat is the good, sensuous kind, carries class implications, and distances me from fat people who are not shaped like some hourglass ideal. The latter medicalises, a modern-day “homosexual”, pathologising natural diversity. These terms also make absolutely no sense - check out Kate Harding’s Illustrated BMI Project.

2. “Obesity” is not a medical condition. I know, I know - medical professionals are saying this all the time, so surely I must be deluded to question their Scientific Facts with my silly-girl politics? But in fact, it is my grasp of the scientific method which forces me to draw this conclusion.

Weight is easy to measure in an experimental context - just stand somebody on a scale; neat, empirical, unfalsifiable. It is much harder to measure lifestyle factors like diet or activity levels - a researcher must either rely on self-report (which is prone to all kinds of biasing factors) or carry out a much more invasive programme of observation. There’s also a large class element as well; people on lower incomes are more likely to work long hours, have little scope for recreational gym-going, and need to consume food with the greatest calorie-per-penny content.

So we end up in a situation where weight (or, worse, the useless BMI scale) is used as a proxy for these harder-to-measure factors. Where mere correlations between weight and disease rates (many of which are not even validated in repeated studies) are reified as omens of an “obesity epidemic”, rather than interrogated until any mechanisms of causation can be demonstrated. And once such weak studies are reported in the media as Hard Fact, which the public are all-too-willing to accept due to general prejudices against fat people, critical thinking has left the building - healthcare policy is based on public opinion, rather than evidence.

And then confirmation bias leads to the media reporting everything anti-fat - up to and including press releases from diet-pill companies - and completely ignoring evidence like the fact that fat people live longer than thin people. The actual evidence here is conflicted at best, people - meta-analyses do not yield strong results for or against any particular body type.

And even if the data pointed strongly towards thin people being healthier than fat people (which it doesn’t), what would you propose we do about it? Because there’s something that a lot of fat people know, that a lot of thin people assume the opposite of (because they’ve never had to try)..

the essential is invisible to the eye: An extensive guide for girls who want to hide some chubby parts of their bodies.

nana-murasaki:

First of all beware this is a REALLY long post. Then let me explain a bit of my ideas about being an XL sized girl. I’m an hourglass shaped girl, and I really like it, the thing is that there are some parts I dislike which are stretching marks, celullitis and varicose veins. In my trip of helping…

I’m sure the OP thinks they are being helpful and this was done in good heart, but just no. Really, really no to the idea that any part of a fat body should be hidden or ‘flattered’ or disguised or reduced so as not to be visible, so as not to offend. No to the idea that fat bodies should wear only certain types of clothing or avoid others, no to the idea of weight loss being a good thing, even if it is done in a ‘healthy’ way (there is no healthy way of losing weight for 95% of people who ‘diet’). There no rules you can follow which will make your fat body acceptable to everyone.

Wear what you want, reveal or hide as much of your flesh as you want, wear stripes, polka dots and bright colours (all at the same time, if that’s what makes you happy) , wear black, wear white, wear your heart on your sleeve, but please, please don’t wear something  because you think it makes you look like you take up less space, or in the hope that others won’t notice you are fat.

I truly hold no blame to OP because I once felt like that too and sometimes, even now, I struggle to give myself permission to be fat in public, wearing the clothes I want to wear.  Every day we get the message that ,what ever we look like, we aren’t good enough, we need to buy this, or wear that or eat less. Honestly,  I feel every time you dress how you want to and make yourself visible as a fat person, you ARE being a hero.

(Source: personifying-art)