Showing posts tagged WoC
mediadiversified:

BLACK BRITISH FEMINISM THEN AND NOW
by Heidi Mirza
‘Thank you for organising this. I thought black feminism was dead!’ wrote a young woman in an email to me. 
In 2006, I had organised a national seminar ‘Black feminism and postcolonial paradigms’ it was received positively.  I found myself asking the question, ‘Has black feminism as a collective movement now become obsolete?’ But, why then I wondered, are we also witnessing a new generation of women of colour coming to political voice in no uncertain terms, especially through their use of social media?
The black British feminism that I was a part of in the 1970s and 1980s, had its roots in the postcolonial activism and the struggles of women migrants from the Caribbean, Africa, and the Indian subcontinent, who had come to live in the UK during the postwar recruitment drive for cheap migrant labour in the 1940s and 50s. Such transnational migration created what Avtar Brah has called new ‘diaspora spaces’, in which ‘individual and collective memories and practices collide and reassemble’, producing new ‘hybrid’ identities that draw upon an array of cultural reference points and histories. 
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mediadiversified:

BLACK BRITISH FEMINISM THEN AND NOW

by Heidi Mirza

‘Thank you for organising this. I thought black feminism was dead!’ wrote a young woman in an email to me.

In 2006, I had organised a national seminar ‘Black feminism and postcolonial paradigms’ it was received positively.  I found myself asking the question, ‘Has black feminism as a collective movement now become obsolete?’ But, why then I wondered, are we also witnessing a new generation of women of colour coming to political voice in no uncertain terms, especially through their use of social media?

The black British feminism that I was a part of in the 1970s and 1980s, had its roots in the postcolonial activism and the struggles of women migrants from the Caribbean, Africa, and the Indian subcontinent, who had come to live in the UK during the postwar recruitment drive for cheap migrant labour in the 1940s and 50s. Such transnational migration created what Avtar Brah has called new ‘diaspora spaces’, in which ‘individual and collective memories and practices collide and reassemble’, producing new ‘hybrid’ identities that draw upon an array of cultural reference points and histories.

Read More

(Reblogged from combinethetwo)

Indra Dugar (1949-1952)

(Source: khwabgah)

(Reblogged from fancybidet)
(Reblogged from redefiningbodyimage)

Sister Rosetta Tharpe rocks in the rain.

18-15n-77-30w:

manakahandmade:

Manaka Handmade Kente Snood… Shop online here…

Some women are just unequaled…incomparable….

What amazing eyes and wonderful make-up.

(Reblogged from theblackdripsgold)

iridessence:

ancestryinprogress:

Tinkerbelle by Studio d’Xavier on Flickr.

YASSSSSSSSSSSS. if i had been on a roller derby team with her, i would’ve stayed in the game longer.

HER HAIR THOGUH

(Source: unnaturalmagic)

(Reblogged from rogueypie)

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

This is Mary Seacole, a Jamaican nurse who saved lives during the Crimean War only to be rewarded with a century’s worth of ignorant comparisons to Florence Nightingale. The woman is a boss.

I still remember how blown away I was the first time I learned about this amazing women. She’s been a personal hero of mine for a very long time.

(Reblogged from saxifraga-x-urbium)

Once you start to speak, people will yell at you. They will interrupt you, put you down and suggest it’s personal. And the world won’t end.


And the speaking will get easier and easier. And you will find you have fallen in love with your own vision, which you may never have realized you had. And you will lose some friends and lovers, and realize you don’t miss them. And new ones will find you and cherish you. And you will still flirt and paint your nails, dress up and party, because, as I think Emma Goldman said, “If I can’t dance, I don’t want to be part of your revolution.” And at last you’ll know with surpassing certainty that only one thing is more frightening than speaking your truth. And that is not speaking.

Audre Lorde (via thechocolatebrigade) the only theorist who can make me cry (via fromonesurvivortoanother)
(Reblogged from maggiemunkee)

blackmanonthemoon:

Nina Simone by Dezo Hoffman.

Her beauty always just grabs my attention like her smooth voice

(Source: elektricity)

(Reblogged from theblackdripsgold)

cosmicyoruba:

horticulturalcephalopod:

The Kim Sisters was a South Korean female trio who made their career in U.S. during 1950s and 60s. They were Sue (Sook-ja), Aija (Ai-ja) and their cousin Mia Kim. The sisters arrived in Las Vegas, Nevada in 1959 and first performed at the Thunderbird Hotel, where producer Tom Ball did a show with Asian artists. Their successful performances at the Thunderbird led them to the Stardust where Ed Sullivan saw the trio and invited the sisters to perform on his show. The sisters performed on the Ed Sullivan show more than 22 times.

they look like they’re having so much fun

i need to find out more about them

IS THIS WEIRD??? THEY SEEM REALLY COOL THOUGH

I’ve seen a video of them performing. They are really awesome.

I really love the photo with them and their gayageums, they seem cool.

(Reblogged from hunky-bat)

One Word Hijabi

(Reblogged from hunky-bat)
shakethecobwebs:

maximushka:

Photographer: Maxim Vakhovskiy

Stunning.

shakethecobwebs:

maximushka:

Photographer: Maxim Vakhovskiy

Stunning.

(Reblogged from sleepydumpling)
Perfect.

Perfect.

(Reblogged from )
(Reblogged from maggiemunkee)

spacewatching:

Melba Roy heads the group of NASA mathematicians, known as “computers,” who track the Echo satellites. Roy’s computations help produce the orbital element timetables by which millions can view the satellite from Earth as it passes overhead.

[In the days when computers wore skirts - ed]

(Reblogged from wilwheaton)