(Reblogged from throbbingtoothacheofthemind)

anagramofbrat:

queennubian:

vixyish:

freshest-tittymilk:

fuckingrenades:

startledatthestillness:

Haha

I’m crying. Omfg.

There are real tears in my eyes

Damn kids

Get off my LAN

GET OFF MY LAN!!!!

*dead* I had to say it out loud. Oh god.

(Source: lashlee)

(Reblogged from wholegrainlofat)

wheeliewifee:

thenewrepublic:

Obamacare is going to end up costing $104 billion LESS than we previously thought. That’s a lot of dollars.

I like to picture the republican leadership curled up in a corner somewhere, crying, as they read all of these positive obamacare stories 

(Reblogged from wheeliewifee)

maggiemunkee:

pardonmewhileipanic:

chubbygoddess:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

be-blackstar:

This is how you handle getting your privileged called out. 

Not “reverse racism!” Not “heterophobe!” and all those other dynamics that don’t exist. Just recognition. Recognition of privilege (and hopefully continuous self-checking) 

^ THIS

That is the correct way BUT it is racism when POC are running around spewing they hate white people,and vise versa.

LOUD SCREECHING WRONG SOUND

Sorry friend, but one white person to another, you are wrong

there is HUGE difference between bias/prejudice/hate, and racism

racism is bias/prejudice/hate + institutionalized power

also, if someone makes a general statement about white people, or the power of whiteness in general, and YOU take PERSONAL offence, instead of listening, learning, and seeing how to improve the spaces you’re in to be more inclusive, then guess what, NOW they ARE talking about YOU.

As white people, we MAY experience hate/bias, but odds are we may never experience it on a direct and individual level, but more “in general” comments made about whiteness as an institution, and we have to know that those comments come from a lifetime of experiencing actual racism, something we will never ever face. 

There are plenty of resources on why things like “reverse racism” isn’t real. I really recommend checking them out and learning more about why a poc saying they hate white people /=/ racism.

#ps i liked this show and I’m sad it didn’t get another season

(Source: lohan)

(Reblogged from maggiemunkee)

thewintersoldiersbutt:

Avengers in a nutshell

View more: Thor, Captain America

(Reblogged from kaylingling7)

(Source: weheartit.com)

(Reblogged from dianebluegreen)

fidenciomartinez:

elmuseo:

artintersections:

Fidencio Martinez is a mixed-media artist based in Memphis, Tennessee, who uses paint and cut paper to “examine the brown body, the battleground onto which events, perceptions and laws are formed.” He is the recipient of the 2013 Jessie and Dolph Smith Emeritus Fellowship Award.

#BADASSARTIST

For more of his work, go to http://www.fidenciomartinez.com/

" #badassartist " I love it.

(Reblogged from purpleishboots)
(Reblogged from maggiemunkee)

writebastard:

Andy Hallett - the actor who portrayed Lorne - died tragically young. From a tooth infection. He had a dental issue in his late 20s, which got infected, and the infection got into his bloodstream, where it fucked up the muscle of his heart, along with its valves. He ended up dying of congestive heart failure at 33.

It’s kind of weird how closely connected your teeth are to heart health, but there it is. Partly it’s because infections of the jaw are close to the major blood vessels of the neck which lead directly to the heart. But there’s something else going on there, as well…coenzyme Q10, a supplement that’s proven to have positive benefits for people with heart disease, also improves gum health. So there’s some sort of periodontal-cardiac nexus o’health! Take care of your teeth, because it might prevent you from dying young.

This has been your Angel-related dental…heart health…post. I guess?

Huh.

(Reblogged from maggiemunkee)
everything-is-stickers:

fezwhatfez:

thequietpagan:

bywandandsword:

Fucking shit

This is simultaneously cool-looking and absolutely terrifying.

i was like, ohhhh what adorable little - AHHHHHH NO

OOOH NO

everything-is-stickers:

fezwhatfez:

thequietpagan:

bywandandsword:

Fucking shit

This is simultaneously cool-looking and absolutely terrifying.

i was like, ohhhh what adorable little - AHHHHHH NO

OOOH NO

(Source: psicreepy)

(Reblogged from rantsofachronicallyillsoul)

asbehsam:

asbehsam:

SIGNAL BOOST, EVERYONE:

Save Satinah Ahmad from execution in Saudi Arabia

When Satinah’s employer tried to smash her head into a wall after months of alleged abuse, Satinah defended herself with a rolling pin.

The 41 year-old foreign domestic worker now faces execution in Saudi Arabia as early as tomorrow.

Call on the King of Saudi Arabia to spare Satinah’s life> http://ow.ly/vjJvQ

It takes one minute guys. JUST ONE MINUTE.

ONLY 1.510 OUT OF 50.000 IS LEFT, COME ON GUYS!

(Reblogged from purpleishboots)

dirkbot:

If you notice me reblogging

  • a repost
  • stolen art
  • false information
  • etc.

please let me know, you’re not rude or annoying and I actually do give a fuck and I will correct my mistake, thank you

(Reblogged from maggiemunkee)

Are you epileptic and can’t have gifs on your dash?

tricks-for:

There’s are several ways to turn off all gifs on your dashboard.

  1. If you have XKit, you can download the “Disable Gifs” extension.
  2. If you want to (permanently) disable any gifs on the web, follow this handy guide (works for Firefox, Internet Explorer and Opera).
  3. There is a Chrome extension that pauses all gifs until you click to start them.

Know more / other ways? Please share!

(Reblogged from maggiemunkee)
thejesusandmarxchain:

roses—and—rue:

Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.

A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.

When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.

She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.

Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.

Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation. 

Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

thejesusandmarxchain:

roses—and—rue:

Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.

A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.

When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.

She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.

Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.

Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.

Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

(Reblogged from purpleishboots)

jessehimself:


Autum Ashante was accepted into the University of Connecticut at age 13.


Stephen R. Stafford II entered Morehouse College at the age 11 with three majors. 


Tony Hansberry II at age 14 developed a time reducing method for hysterectomies at Shands Hospital 

Honor them by sharing this post.

(Source: rare-ethnic-images-and-truth)

(Reblogged from maggiemunkee)